PUBLIC SPEAKING TIP: CONQUER STAGE FRIGHT

Perhaps, there is no effective way to deal with nervousness but to deal with it squarely. Everyone who’s in the business of public speaking understands the feeling of standing in front of the crowd and delivering your speech.

There has been no more dreadful experience as compared to speaking in front of a huge crowd. In fact, in more than 1,000 people surveyed in a certain study, they would rather jokingly prefer to die instead of participating in a public speaking engagement.

This provides evidence that more than 86% of people object to the idea of delivering speeches and conducting talks, which in turn exposes themselves to possible ridicule should mistakes arise.

Symptoms of Stage Fright

Let’s face it; nobody is perfect. Famous orators, statesmen, leaders of nations, and even the most well-read scholars become fidgety before and during speeches. This very same fact puts you on an equal level with them and confirms its normality.

Despite these facts, people sometimes find it difficult to handle such situations and end up ruining such an important event. Among the symptoms of the above conditions are the following:

Excessive perspiration (sweat)
Unexplained nervousness
Sudden drop in body temperature
Abrupt onset of sore throat
Dry lips and mouth
Skin starts to look pale
Trembling knees, lips and voice
Increased palpitations
Nauseating feeling
Irregular breathing pattern

Overpowering Stage Fright

Before devising plans to minimize the effects of social phobia, it is best to identify the source of nervousness, why it occurs and how you could possibly lessen, if not ultimately abate such physical anxiety.

Just as experts in the field suffer from such feelings, ordinary people need not be overly concerned that they are alone. The truth is, such physical trepidity is a fact of life.

Swart, Margolis, and Den Boer, three authorities in public speaking, articulated on their views about speech and oration and the reason for the characterized physiological responses of people undergoing such processes.

They commented on the truth that people expecting humiliation and fear of public inspection and examination become overly saturating to the point where one is no longer able to deliver a quality talk.

Perchance, as long as you are alive and you are able to respond to the many things happening in your environment, the feeling of anxiety, nervousness, and fear arising from such a situation prevails.

Tips for Overcoming Stage Fright

Below are tips on how to get better with the dangers of public speaking. They are not meant to take away the feeling of panic during your speech but will, in a way, help you manage the stress associated with the situation.

You don’t have to follow all the recommendations listed below but choosing one or two or a combination of any of the ones which you think will work best for you is one roadmap to making your speech as perfect as you want it to be.

Don’t let the situation control you. Use that nerve to your advantage and walk with confidence with your speech as your effective tool in controlling others with your convincing remarks.

Take a Deep Breath – relax and focus on your breathing. This will ease up your stressed muscles and will help you concentrate on your speech.

Resist Intimidation – Forget speaking in front of people who are smarter than you. A university study shows that more often than not, more than 80% of your audience at a time does not have a complete background on your topic. This gives you a leading edge and puts you on a higher level of intellectual advantage.

Be Prepared – Nothing beats a well-prepared speech plan. Get enough practice and repeat it as many times as you can.

Ward Off Physical Distractions – Eliminate details which can cause confusion and distract you from your main business. Uncomfortable clothing and accessories that are irritating to the skin causes skin rashes. Wear light clothing or something which you are comfortable with.

Establish Eye Contact – Making eye to eye contact with your audience is the best way to deliver sincere and convincing oral discourse. It allows your audience to keep their attention on you and concentrate on what you have to say.

Choose the Right Food at the Right Time – Eat at least 3 hours before your actual speech. Food taken long enough before you do your talk perks your body up and provides you with the necessary energy to carry on the task of speaking.

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